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Podcast – Heloise Vilaseca, Director Of Innovation And Research Of El Celler De Can Roca (Spain) On The Future Of Fine Dining Experiences

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This is a very, very tip of the edge of the future. Héloïse Vilaseca is a chemical engineer specializing in the fields of science and cooking. After seven years collaborating with the Alicia Foundation/ El Bulli, as project manager for food, science and education projects, she join the Harvard University for a semester as Lab Manager for the Science & Cooking Course in 2011. Then, she got involved during a couple of years in Paris in a start up company in food tech. Currently, and for the last five years, she runs La Masia at El Celler de Can Roca, where sustainability, training and creativity are the main focus. When she talks about sustainability in fine dining we should listen. When she talks about subtle but important shifts in how we cook and prepare food we should also think about it too.

What qualifies as fine dining has always been an edge example of how society is evolving. It is like the fashion industry, but for the taste buds. The discussion today is as much about how we eat, prepare and think about the eco-system that feeds us and also what our potential future food fashion habits might look, smell and taste like than just the idea of fine dining that fewer than 5% of us experience.

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This is a very, very tip of the edge of the future. Héloïse Vilaseca is a chemical engineer specializing in the fields of science and cooking. After seven years collaborating with the Alicia Foundation/ El Bulli, as project manager for food, science and education projects, she join the Harvard University for a semester as Lab Manager for the Science & Cooking Course in 2011. Then, she got involved during a couple of years in Paris in a start up company in food tech. Currently, and for the last five years, she runs La Masia at El Celler de Can Roca, where sustainability, training and creativity are the main focus. When she talks about sustainability in fine dining we should listen. When she talks about subtle but important shifts in how we cook and prepare food we should also think about it too.

What qualifies as fine dining has always been an edge example of how society is evolving. It is like the fashion industry, but for the taste buds. The discussion today is as much about how we eat, prepare and think about the eco-system that feeds us and also what our potential future food fashion habits might look, smell and taste like than just the idea of fine dining that fewer than 5% of us experience.

Source: Forbes – Entrepreneurs
Author: Michael Gale, Contributor