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Why Did Volkswagen Kill The Beetle?

Why Did Volkswagen Kill The Beetle?

Volkswagen is one of the world’s largest automakers. It houses brands such as Audi, Porsche, and Bentley. But perhaps its best-known vehicle is the Volkswagen Beetle. Over its entire lifespan, Volkswagen sold over 22.5 million of all three versions of the Beetle. But in July of 2019, production one of the most iconic and important cars of all time came to an end.

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Why Global Military Spending Is On The Rise

Why Global Military Spending Is On The Rise

Global military spending reached a post-Cold War high of $1.8 trillion in 2018 according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The Swedish-based think tank has published widely sited global spending numbers since the 1960s. Is the world entering a new era of great power conflict?

The United States (41%) and China (14%) — the world’s two biggest military spenders — played a major role in driving 2018′s spending to new heights. Countries throughout the Asia-Pacific region have taken notice of China’s nearly two decade push and upped their spending.

The U.S. “war on terror” helped increase global spending after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, but started to taper off around 2011 as the United States faced internal budget pressures and war fatigue. But in 2018, the U.S. began increasing spending once again as the national security focus shifted from terrorism to the rise of China and resurgence of Russia.

While Russia did not increase spending in 2018, the country did complete an expensive military modernization in 2016. President Vladimir Putin’s snatching of Crimea, the destabilization of Ukraine, and election meddling have also helped push spending up in former Soviet states like Poland, Latvia, Lithuania and Romania.

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Why Global Military Spending Is On The Rise

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Why Tim Hortons Struggles In The United States

Why Tim Hortons Struggles In The United States

Tim Hortons is Canada’s one-stop shop for coffee, breakfast, lunch and donuts, but now, the company needs to expand elsewhere. The U.S. has long been a target market, but they’ve struggling in America for decades. Watch this video to find out why this Canadian icon can’t win over its southern neighbors and beat out brands like McDonald’s, Taco Bell, and Dunkin’ Donuts in the breakfast wars.

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Why Tim Hortons Struggles In The United States

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The Rise And Fall Of The Headphone Jack

The Rise And Fall Of The Headphone Jack

The headphone jack has a long legacy in the audio world. So when Apple decided to exclude it from the iPhone 7, consumers were up in arms. In the years since, Samsung has been a champion for those who still wanted the headphone jack Samsung even went so far as to run a headphone jack commercial mocking Apple. But with the release of the Galaxy Note 10, it too has forgotten the decades-old technology. Did Samsung prove Apple right by killing the headphone jack?

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The Rise And Fall Of The Headphone Jack

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Can Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10+ Shoot Pro-Quality Video?

Can Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10+ Shoot Pro-Quality Video?

Samsung’s $1,099 Galaxy Note 10+ is the best Android phone you can buy. It’s packed with everything most people want in a modern flagship device, from a great display to awesome cameras, even if there are a few sacrifices, such as no standard headphone jack.

It starts at $1,099, which is expensive for most people. But it offers pretty much anything you could want out of a phone, including great battery life, fast charging, tons of storage and water resistance.

It also has Samsung’s S Pen stylus for jotting notes and new air gestures that let you control music, the camera and more.

Samsung and Apple’s earnings reports have shown that buyers are reluctant to purchase phones that cost $1,000 or more, instead choosing to hang on to older devices for longer. But there are still buyers in the segment, and for folks who don’t want an iPhone, the Galaxy Note 10+ is your best bet.

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Can Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10+ Shoot Pro-Quality Video?

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How The US-China Trade War Turned Into A Currency War

How The US-China Trade War Turned Into A Currency War

The Trump administration has turned its sights on China’s currency as the two countries continue to trade blows in the ongoing trade war. In early August 2019, the U.S. Treasury Department designated China as a currency manipulator, shortly after the yuan fell sharply and send markets into a tailspin. Here’s what a currency war looks like, and what it means for the trade war and global markets.
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How The US-China Trade War Turned Into A Currency War

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The Tesla Roadster Whisperer

The Tesla Roadster Whisperer

Carl Medlock used to work at Tesla. Now he’s one of the few people in the U.S. that can fix the company’s original Roadster car. Medlock & Sons in Seattle rehabs Tesla Roadsters, and can fix any electric car — they also convert internal combustion engine vehicles into pure battery electrics.

Roadster drivers may be some of the earliest supporters of Tesla, but many feel neglected by Elon Musk’s car company. Unlike owners of the newer Model S, X or 3, they can’t book a service appointment through the Tesla app, and the carmaker doesn’t manufacture spare parts for their vehicles even though they’re only about 11 years old.

Since 2014, the tucked-away repair shop Medlock & Sons has been one of the only places where Roadster owners can send their beloved electric cars for serious repairs, upgrades or maintenance if they’re not getting what they need from Tesla.

One customer had his Roadster waiting at a Tesla service center for over a year because the component it required, a 400-volt controller, wasn’t available according to records Medlock shared with CNBC. Although Tesla put the customer in a loaner Model S while he was waiting, he eventually took his Roadster to Medlock.

Typically, people go to Medlock & Sons to fix their crashed Roadsters, or to have their Roadster electronics rebuilt, ceramic coatings painted on, or to have sound reduction, custom audio or custom headlights installed. Many of the shop’s clients are leaders in the tech industry, or actors and other celebrities, who refer to Medlock as the “Roadster whisperer.”

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The Rise Of Toyota

The Rise Of Toyota

Toyota became one of the world’s largest automakers by churning out cars, trucks, and sport utility vehicles. In the United States several models were among the country’s best selling cars in 2018 including the Toyota Corolla, Camry, Highlander and Tacoma.

Over the years, Toyota has grown a reputation for being affordable, reliable, safe and… kind of boring. A scion of the Toyoda family, Akio Toyoda, now has the reins at the company and has given the company a severe order for no more boring cars.

Now the Japanese giant is doubling down on speed, adventure, and cutting edge technology, in a bid to survive and succeed. It recently relaunched the Toyota Supra, which was originally produced from the late 1970s to the early 2000s.

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The Rise Of Toyota

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How Amazon Fends Off Unions

How Amazon Fends Off Unions

Amazon workers have held an increased number of protests over the last year, which is one sign that momentum to organize has picked up among some of its 650,000 worldwide employees. But unionizing efforts so far have not succeeded. Amazon increased minimum wage to $15 an hour last year and offers generous benefits. It’s also fending off unions using tweets, training videos and internal hires. Watch the video to learn what unions are all about and how they could impact Amazon and its workers.

*** Correction *** This video incorrectly refers to Amazon’s spokesperson as Rachael Lightly. Her name is Rachael Lighty.

Three big unions that are talking to Amazon workers are the Teamsters, the United Food & Commercial Workers Union, and the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, among others. Recent worker protests point to organizing efforts.

On Amazon Prime Day in July, a handful of Amazon workers at a fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, went on strike. It was the first strike by U.S. workers during the company’s annual sales events that started five years ago, and one of several protests that’s taken place in the U.S. in the past year.

Throughout Amazon’s 25-year history, there have been multiple rumblings of workers trying to unionize. So far, none of the efforts have been successful. With record-breaking sales numbers and newly doubled shipping speeds, however, momentum to organize has picked up among some of Amazon’s more than 650,000 worldwide employees.

Efforts to curb union activity inside Amazon include a leaked training video that was sent to Whole Foods managers in 2018. In it, an animated man wearing a yellow safety vest says, “We are not anti-union, but we are not neutral either. We do not believe unions are in the best interest of our customers or shareholders or most importantly, our associates.”

It goes on to give tips to managers for spotting union activity. “Make it a point to regularly talk to associates in the break room. This will help protect you from accusations that you were only in the break room to spy on pro union associates.” Amazon notes the training video has not been used since last year and says it was in compliance with the National Labor Relations Act.

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How Amazon Fends Off Unions

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Why ‘Money Disorders’ May Be Ruining Your Budget

Why 'Money Disorders' May Be Ruining Your Budget

In December 2018, consumer debt overall hit a record high. Experts say a significant amount of this debt can be explained by what they call “money disorders.” Knowing if you have one can be the key to fixing your budget. Watch this video to learn more about how to tell if you have one — and how to treat it.
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Why ‘Money Disorders’ May Be Ruining Your Budget

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