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FREE PowerPoint Templates for Professional Presentations

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Jumpstart your next presentation with trendy, customizable designs by downloading these FREE professional PowerPoint templates.

Here are two completely custom and customizable PowerPoint templates available as a free download. One template’s theme is organic, modern branding, while the other is powerful, bold, and minimal.

FREE Powerpoint Templates …

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12 High-Quality and Far-Out Free Psychedelic Fonts

There’s a resurgence of psychedelia in design, so add your own ’60s flair with these twelve free psychedelic fonts.

The ’60s and ’70s were a wild ride when it came to posters, music festivals, attire, and color choices. Accompanying the widespread experimentation of all sorts (drugs, music, lifestyles) came new, psychedelic forms of expression — often fueled by hallucinations — which gave us Psychedelic Art. From the bright swirls of color to the stunning typography inspired by Art Nouveau posters, this era of design has remained influential throughout the decades.

Modern designers are interpreting the warped typography and intense color choices to create energetic packaging designs, brand identities, logos, and more. You’ll see a resurgence of hallucinogenic visuals and vibrant color combinations, but reinterpreted for today’s world.

Typography can tie together all elements of your design. But finding the right style — at an affordable price point — is a whole different ball game. To help you add the perfect ’60s or ’70s touch to your composition, we’ve rounded up twelve free, high-quality psychedelic-inspired fonts. Simply go to the link under each section for your free download.


1. Art-Nuvo

The Art Nouveau movement has had a huge impact on psychedelic typography. Featuring slightly rugged and organic letterforms, this free psychedelic font, designed by Phil MacIsaac, is perfect for adorning festival posters and groovy graphics.

Download the Art-Nuvo font from Dribbble here.

Art-Nuvo – Free Psychedelic Font
Inspired by the Art Nouveau movement, this font is the perfect addition to any festival graphic. Image via svekloid.

2. Bigfat Script

Bigfat Script incorporates all things thick and groovy with its exaggerated letterforms, effortless swashes, and drop shadow additions. Take your designs to the far-out past with this eye-catching script font.

Download the Bigfat Script font from Dafont here.

Bigfat Script – Free Psychedelic Font
This heavy weight script font incorporates all things groovy. Image via svekloid.

3. Chicle

Sudtipos’s Chicle font is a playful interpretation of run-of-the-mill packaging typography. Featuring stylistic cues from the Art Nouveau period, Chicle is a lighthearted choice for your next project.

Download the Chicle font from Google Fonts here.

Chicle – Free Psychedelic Font
Chicle’s playful appearance is perfect for your next packaging design project. Image via Markovka.

4. Dreamland

Add that ’60s touch to your designs with this trendy display font. Its curved and linear look creates a style that hints to the good ol’ days. This fun font also comes packed with a different variation that’s sprinkled with stars.

Download the Dreamland font from Dafont here.

Dreamland – Free Psychedelic Font
Dreamland’s linear look adds that retro touch to any composition. Image via Leszek Glasner.

5. Funghetto

While Funghetto takes stylistic cues from the culture of the seventies, the typeface brings an unexpected twist, with the help of exaggerated letterforms. Elevate your next festival design by incorporating this eye-catching font.

Download the Funghetto font from Dafont here.

Funghetto – Free Psychedelic Font
Drift from the norm with Funghetto’s trippy-dippy letterforms. Image via Golden Shrimp.

6. Funkydori

Designed by Laura Worthington, Funkydori is a fresh take on the brush script style. Its thick swashes and bodacious letterforms are a typographic homage to the groovy ’70s.

Download the Funkydori font from Adobe Fonts here.

Funkydori – Free Psychedelic Font
Funkydori’s bodacious letterforms are sure to attract attention. Image via Pixejoo.

7. Ginchiest

A slang for the “coolest,” Ginchiest is a bold take on retro vintage typography. Its classic ’70s appearance is perfect for logotype, headings, and festival graphics.

Download the Ginchiest font from Dafont here.

Ginchiest – Free Psychedelic Font
Inject all things hip with this stunning font. Image via Andrey Korshenkov.

8. Mustardo

Give your compositions a retro twist with this ’70s-style script font, designed by StereoType. Mustardo’s bottom-heavy letterforms provide a flared appearance seen in groovy posters. Pair this thick script with a monoweight sans serif for a balanced design.

Download the Mustardo font from Dafont here.

Mustardo – Free Psychedelic Font
Need a groovy font for your design? Look no further than Mustardo. Image via AKIllustration.

9. Psychedelic Caps

This iconic psychedelic typeface takes stylistic cues from the Art Nouveau and late ’60s — from the dramatic, yet condensed, letterforms to the unique negative space. Use this stunning font in your next party invitation or festival graphic for that emblematic ’60s vibe.

Download the Psychedelic Caps font from Dafont here.

Psychedelic Caps – Free Psychedelic Font
This font is everything you need for a perfect psychedelic design. Image via Mott Jordan.

10. Shrikhand

Designed by Jonny Pinhorn, Shrikhand is a heavier take on the typical brush script style. It features rounded terminals and drastic spurs, rendering Shrikhand perfect for any psychedelic-inspired designs.

Download the Shrikhand font from Google Fonts here.

Shrikhand – Free Psychedelic Font
Shrikhand is the ideal blend of groovy and script. Image via Oana_Unciuleanu.

11. Spicy Rice

Spicy Rice adds some groovy flair to any design with its bell-bottomed letterforms and curled terminals. This font’s far-out appearance make it ideal for headings or medium-sized copy.

Download the Spicy Rice font from Google Fonts here.

Spicy Rice – Free Psychedelic Font
Add some spice to your ’60s-inspired designs with this typeface. Image via shotty.

12. Victor Moscoso

Inspired by the famous works of Victor Moscoso, this font is a typographic homage to 19th Century wood type and the Neon Rose posters of the late ’60s. Add this psychedelic font to your next invitation or poster for a much-needed retro twist.

Download the Victor Moscoso font from Dafont here.

Victor Moscoso – Free Psychedelic Font
This bell-bottomed font is everything you need for a groovy graphic. Image via Space Oleandr.

Cover image via Andrey Korshenkov.

Interested in additional free fonts for your next project? Check out more below:

Explore millions of royalty-free images, photos and more.

Source: The Shutterstock Blog

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64 FREE Flower Images to Layer on Your Designs

Help your next design blossom with 64 FREE full-bloom, individual, and on-trend flower photos.

Searches on Shutterstock for flower-centric keywords like “live wall” and “flowerscape” have been steadily increasing. That’s why we’re predicting the floral-forward In Full Bloom look will be a major Creative Trend in 2020. These aren’t delicate flowers embroidered on silk – they’re loud, bright, and all-encompassing.

To help you add the In Full Bloom trend to your designs, we’re giving away 64 high-quality photos of several types of flowers. 175MB of bold and beautiful blooms, and with transparent backgrounds to maximize versatility for any design, print or digital.

Below, we’ve shared a few ways to use these these transparent floral images. Of course, you could just drop them onto any image for a bit of flair, but if you go just a bit further, you’ll begin to see how many ways these images can be used.

How to Download The Free Flower Images Pack

Downloading these 64 free flower images is simple. Just click on the button below for direction to your download. Then, double-click the ZIP file to unpackage its contents and you’ll see all the flowers neatly labeled.

By downloading this free Flower Images pack, you agree not to resell or redistribute these assets.

Accents, Elements, and Borders

As standalone images, you can create your own virtual bouquets. These images are PNG files, with transparent backgrounds and tight clipping. That means all you see is flowers – no background to deal with or remove yourself.

Health and beauty photo with flower background
Add some organic ingredients to a skin care brand.
Image via F8 studio

Just drag and drop the images onto your canvas, in any layout or design app, and stack and arrange them however you want. For example, you can turn them around, flip them, or change the orientation for an easy, colorful wreath.

Use free flower images to make a digital wreath
A simple colorful wreath can serve as a holiday card, or add text and info for a summer festival invitation.

You can also use them sparingly, as accents. This will allow you to spruce up an image without overtaking it. You can use the flowers to get a bold, but subtle look at the same time.

Layer the flower images onto photos for avant-garde designs
Or just do weird stuff.
Image via AS photo studio

Typography Accents

Apart from using them on an image, use the flowers to create an interplay with your typography. Use masking and layers to add further depth to a flat headline.

Drop shadows, hard or soft, can be used to change the perspective of a typography-centric design without resorting to supporting images – which saves you from having to work out whether the image supports the text or if it overtakes it. Make the letters and flowers intertwine for interesting looks.

Use flower images on typography

Use the flowers as drop-cap accents. You can even create lettering with a bunch of little flowers lined up to make words.

Flower image used on drop case letter

Free Flower Images as Patterns

Arrange the flowers in a repeating motif to create your own patterns. Go crazy mixing them up, alternating them, changing the order, or use the same one over and over. Technically speaking, you can use them to create hundreds of thousands of image combinations.

Flower images as seamless patterned background

Floral Masks

Drop these blossoms into an image with ultimate control by using masks. Draw off parts of an image to create organic borders, or containers, to add more of a patterned look. Use the component shapes and subjects of a host image to transform an image naturally, but in unexpected ways.

Use masks to add flower images to a photo
Create a screen projection look with a simple masked outline, to make a 3D image flat.
Image via Oleg Gekman

Whether you’re completely saturating the mask area with flowers, or arranging the flowers in a geometric way to mimic a printed pattern, the areas you mask will be a great host for these so long as you follow their contours.

Add flower images in subtle ways to designs
Add elements to anything you want with a mask. Even fashion patterns and accents.
Image via Anastasiia Horova

Or, get crazy and use your own shapes overlaid on an image. You can also create an entire image strictly of masks, containing your unique patterns and arrangements of the flower images. Go nuts, they’re literally yours to enjoy.

Blend Modes

Aside from arrangements and settings, Blend Modes in Photoshop will give you more control over the depth, color, transparency, opacity, and saturation of the flowers either in groups or individually.

Use blend modes on a design
Versatile looks with Blend Modes: The top row is using the Multiply blend mode on a white background. The bottom row uses the Overlay blend mode on a black background.

Mix and match all the techniques to come up with your own usage combos. The sky’s the limit and with each exploration you’ll be spreading joy, color, and life through your designs.

Blend modes using flower images
This is using Blend Modes, masks, and patterns to layer the shapes and the flower images, letting them mix with the elements above or below in the layer order.

Interested in more free design assets and resources? Check out these articles below:

With a powerful search and curated collections, finding footage is easy.

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FREE Art Deco Design Pack—Patterns, Borders, Shapes, and More

The glamor and symmetry of the beloved Art Deco style is seeing a resurgence in our 2020 Creative Trends. Download this pack of 45 free Art Deco elements to add a hint of luxe to your designs.

What’s old is new again. A major creative trend for this year, The Roaring 2020s brings back all things luxurious, reviving the iconic elements of a beloved era. In this major trend, you’ll see a huge resurgence of all things Art Deco: geometric patterns, elegant color palettes, eye-catching borders, and typography.

To help supplement your projects, we’ve created a vast collection of forty-five Art Deco-inspired patterns, swatches, borders, dividers, and more. We’ve also rounded up a collection of fifteen free Art Deco fonts to complement this free download. Scroll down to get a peek of this lavish freebie, then read on to learn how to make the most of these Art Deco elements in your next design.


What’s Included in This Free Art Deco Design Pack

This free Art Deco pack features 45 total elements that can be used for multiple applications, from personal backgrounds to social media elements. In the download, you’ll receive access to twelve patterns, eleven borders and dividers, twelve color swatches, and ten pattern swatches.

FREE Art Deco Design Pack—Patterns, Borders, Shapes, and More — Repeating Pattens Preview
A preview of some of the patterns available in the Art Deco Design Pack.

The patterns are available as EPS, JPG, and AI swatch files, while the border elements are available as EPS and PNG files. The same designs are saved as different file types to ensure anyone can use the Art Deco Pack in any editing or design software.

All you need to do is place the PNG or JPG files into any design software, such as Shutterstock Editor, or manipulate the vector EPS files in Adobe Illustrator to create your next design.


How to Download The Free Art Deco Pack

Downloading this free Art Deco Design Pack is simple. Just click on the button below for direction to your download. Then, double-click the ZIP file to unpackage its contents and you’ll see the designs in their respective folders.

By downloading this free Art Deco Design Pack, you agree not to resell or redistribute these assets.


Create a Stunning Invitation Card Design

Art Deco patterns and borders can be used in a multitude of designs, especially in invitation cards. Tile the patterns for an effortless background, or apply the borders to doll up your card. No matter what you’re using these graphics for, they are sure to spruce up any composition.

In this tutorial, we’ll create a stunning invitation card for an event. Start off by creating an Illustrator document around 252 by 360 pixels, or any size that fits the needs of your composition. Depending on the application of your design, set the color mode to CMYK or RGB. Go ahead and download the Art Deco Design Pack, then open up the EPS or JPG files in Illustrator or any other editing program.

First off, we’re going to add the background to the artboard. There are many ways to apply the patterns as a background in your designs. Use the AI pattern swatch, or by tile the pattern itself.

If you’d like to use the pattern swatches to quickly change your background, head to the Swatches panel and head to the dropdown menu on the right of the panel. Go down to Open Swatch Library > Other Library, then head to the Swatches folder > Art Deco Pattern Swatches and click Open. The imported pattern swatches will appear in a new menu, ready to be used.

FREE Art Deco Design Pack—Patterns, Borders, Shapes, and More — Art Deco Invitation Card Background
Apply pattern swatches to vector shapes to quickly change your background, or import the EPS pattern files and tile away.

For this Art Deco-themed invitation, I used the EPS files so that I could easily change the hues are needed. Simply duplicate the pattern by holding down the Option key and dragging across. Use the Align palette to center align the patterns to the artboard.

Next up, let’s import the borders and frames. Head back to the Art Deco download, click on the EPS folder, and find the Art Deco Elements file. Open up the EPS file in Illustrator and copy and paste any of the elements over to your document with Command + C and Command + V, respectively. Utilize the Direct Selection Tool (A) to adjust the size of the borders as needed.

FREE Art Deco Design Pack—Patterns, Borders, Shapes, and More — Art Deco Invitation Card Border
Art Deco borders help to frame your card details.

Now it’s time to add in those important event details. Activate the Text Tool (T) and click and drag across to create your text box. Head over to the Character panel and find a typeface that works with your design. For a Roaring ’20s inspired event, an Art Deco typeface such as Market Deco is the perfect one for the job.

FREE Art Deco Design Pack—Patterns, Borders, Shapes, and More — Art Deco Invitation Card with Free Fonts
An Art Deco tyepface such as Market Deco perfectly fits the theme of the invitation. For more free Art Deco fonts, check out this article.

Add all necessary details, such as the event name, date, time, attire, and RSVP information. Be sure to display important information clearly for attendees. Use the Selection Tool (V) and the Paragraph panel to edit and arrange your text for the best composition.

FREE Art Deco Design Pack—Patterns, Borders, Shapes, and More — Finished Art Deco Invitation Card

Interested in more free design assets and resources? Check out these articles below:

Our curated collections make finding images easy.

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Free Lightroom Presets for Epic Adventure Photography

These five FREE Wild Life Lightroom Presets are specifically tuned to help your outdoor shots reach their snow-capped peaks.

If you use Adobe Lightroom CC and want the fastest, easiest route to make your adventure photos “pop,” you’re about to download five of the best presets you can find. These presets will turn your Instagram feed into an awesome outdoors adventure.

Wild Life is a rising Creative Trend for 2020 all about outdoor photography and videography. Images and footage of people getting out of their comfort zone to explore the wild are dominating everything from social media to brand commercial spots. Even for industries that are as distant from the outdoors as can be—tech, finance, health care— these visuals provide a lasting way to stir emotions and connect with users on a visceral level.

man on cliff
Image via everst

A staple of the Wild Life trend is the moody lighting, which can range from washed-out vintage to dark and romantic. There’s also an emphasis on greens and blues—the colors in nature.

To get the Wild Life look on your own photos, just download this free pack of Lightroom Landscape Presets. Whether you use them to give your outdoor photos a facelift, or you apply them to another type of shot, they’re a super easy way to give your photos that super-shareable style.

Download Five FREE Lightroom Presets

Let’s look at how you can add Wild Life to your adventure photos on Instagram with these five FREE Lightroom Presets.


Installation

After you download your Free Wild Life Presets, follow this simple guide to install them. Then, read below for details on how to use each one, with tips in each section for ways to fine-tune some of the individual settings in Lightroom CC.


Vintage Film

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Couple Kayaking on a Lake
BEFORE. Image via G-Stock Studio.
Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Free Vintage Film Preset
AFTER: Add fade to your photos for that old school “film” look. Image via G-Stock Studio.

Harkening back to childhood memories and the look of film photos, this Vintage Film preset will add just the right amount of “fade” to your adventure shots.

Vintage Film reduces contrast, softening the overly-digital look of the Blacks in your photo. It also adds color to the highlights.

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Fine-Tuning the Film Look
Fine-tuning the “film” look. Image via G-Stock Studio.

Find the Edit menu on the right side of the Lightroom window, represented by the icon with three little sliders. Under the Light section, adjust the Blacks and Highlights to control the contrast and fine-tune the film look.


Glaciers

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Red Kayak Floating Among Icebergs
BEFORE: The original here is cold, but we wanted harsher blues. Image via DCrane.
Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Free Glaciers Preset
AFTER: Add the Glacier preset to intensify the feel of a cold environment. Image via DCrane.

This familiar look — with solid slabs of white snow, ice, or sky against deep and rich foliage or rocks — will make you feel Alaska, no matter what tropical climate you view it from. Use the Glaciers preset to intensify these cold environments, with or without people as subjects.

Play with the Shadows slider to bring out or bury the details in a bright photo. Also, use the Temp controls to turn down the heat even more.


Campfire

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Free Campfire Preset
Apply the Campfire preset to warm up your shot. Image via Songquan Deng.

On the flip side of Glaciers, during cold climbs in the alpine-altitude chill, certain shots come across as a little too frigid. You might want to build a little campfire to warm it up a little. The Campfire preset will do just that, subtly changing the temperature and detail of the photo.

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Female Hiker Overlooking Lake Louise
Notice the difference in detail and color compared to the previous photo. Image via Songquan Deng.

Use the Temp slide, under the White Balance section in the Color controls, to adjust the relative warmth of the photo.


Van Life

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Travel RV in the Alps
BEORE: The original here is cool, but this preset makes it EPIC. Image via Andrey Armyagov.
Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Free Epic Van Life Preset
AFTER: Create more depth, scale, and drama by applying the Epic Van Life preset. Image via Andrey Armyagov.

#VanLife is the ultimate, actually doable, escapist fantasy for those of us with families. Imagine living in a well-appointed mobile home at a fraction of the cost of stationary life. A mobile home you can drive into the mountains, onto a beach, or even a desert locale for the winter.

Apply that aspirational look to your photos — van included or not — to keep the fires of your life-plan alive. Adjust the Dehaze control in the Effects menu to deepen or pull back the drama that various skies exhibit. You’d be surprised what you find there.


Mountain Portrait

Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Free Mountain Portrait Preset
BEFORE: With portrait shots, often times shadows cause uneven distribution of light. Image via William Hager.
Free Lightroom Landscape Presets for Adventure Photos — Hiker Posing in Front of a Mountain
AFTER: The difference is subtly, but look under the hat for where the adjustments count. Image via William Hager.

Mountain portraiture can be very challenging. Especially during mid-day — when we’re most likely to be doing the activities we want to be photographed doing — the sun in the mountains is pretty unforgiving. Harsh and directly overhead, our hats (or other accouterments) can inhibit evenly distributed exposure across this hard-clipped light spectrum.

This preset goes after the midtones to handle all the shades of different people in shadow, without encroaching on the colors and light properties that make the landscape beautiful — mostly. Any enhancements in the skin tone-range are indeed applied to the landscape in ways that boost them, allowing the detail and the colors — like green and red — to remain mostly natural, or slightly enhanced, to a pleasing degree.


Cover image via G-Stock Studio.

Want more FREE Lightroom presets (and tips on how to use them)? Check these out.

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