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How Iceland Is Closing the Gender Wage Gap

Iceland’s equal pay for equal work system is still in the early stages, but initial signs suggest that requiring organizations prove they compensate employees fairly may be very effective. Much more effective, in any case, than the alternatives currently in place elsewhere. Introduced in 2018, the policy requires companies and institutions with more than 25 employees to prove that they pay men and women equally for a job of equal value. If companies show they pay equally for the same positions, they receive certification. Beginning in 2020, certification became a requirement and companies without certification incur a daily fine. The few issues …

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Gender Equity Is Not Zero Sum

To make progress toward gender equity, men need to be involved. But zero-sum bias often deters men from engaging in the conversation (let alone taking action) because it fuels the belief that men must sacrifice their resources or stature for women to earn a place at the table. Although zero-sum thinking is invalidated by the data, it pervades the workplace equity narrative.
Fortunately, organizations can take specific actions to overcome the zero-sum bias among male employees and move the needle on matters of gender equity: quantify gender equity in terms of economic gains for the company; hold leaders accountable for …

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Research: Women Are Better Leaders During a Crisis

There has been a lot said about how women have done a better job leading during the Covid-19 crisis than men. According to an analysis of 360-degree assessments conducted between March and June of this year, women were rated by those who work with them as more effective. The gap between men and women in the pandemic is even larger than previously measured, possibly indicating that women tend to perform better in a crisis. In fact, women were rated more positively on 13 of the 19 competencies that comprise overall leadership effectiveness in the authors’ assessment.

When discussing the careers of women …

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How the Gender Balance of Investment Teams Shapes the Risks They Take

There’s solid research  showing that women are more risk-averse than men when it comes to picking stocks, investing in venture capital, or making acquisitions. However, new research suggests that women may be more likely than men to take “social” risks — that is, to take risks when the decisions have important human or social consequences, in addition to financial ones.

Women are more risk averse than men on average — at least that’s what research and received wisdom seem to suggest. Women take fewer risks when picking stocks, investing in venture capital, and making acquisitions, for example. There are various …

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