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Decrypted: Uber’s former security chief charged, FBI’s ‘vishing’ warning

A lot happened in cybersecurity over the past week.

The University of Utah paid almost half a million dollars to stop hackers from leaking sensitive student data after a ransomware attack. Two major ATM makers patched flaws that could’ve allowed for fraudulent cash withdrawals from vulnerable ATMs. Grant Schneider, the U.S. federal chief information security officer, is leaving his post after more than three decades in government. And, a new peer-to-peer botnet is spreading like wildfire and infecting millions of machines around the world.

In this week’s column, we look at how Uber’s handling of its 2016 data breach put the company’s former chief security officer in hot water with federal prosecutors. And, what is “vishing” and why should companies take note?


THE BIG PICTURE

Uber’s former security chief charged with data breach cover-up

Joe Sullivan, Uber’s former security chief, was indicted this week by federal prosecutors for allegedly trying to cover up a data breach in 2016 that saw 57 million rider and driver records stolen.

Sullivan paid $100,000 in a “bug bounty” payment to the two hackers, who were also charged with the breach, in exchange for signing a nondisclosure agreement. It wasn’t until a year after the breach that former Uber chief executive Travis Kalanick was forced out and replaced with Dara Khosrowshahi, who fired Sullivan after learning of the cyberattack. Sullivan now serves as Cloudflare’s chief security officer.

The payout itself isn’t the issue, as some had claimed. Prosecutors in San Francisco took issue with how Sullivan allegedly tried to bury the breach, which later resulted in a massive $148 million settlement with the Federal Trade Commission.

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Fintech regulations in Latin America could fuel growth or freeze out startups

It may have entered the game later than other leading regions such as Europe and North America, but Latin America’s fintech industry is dynamic and growing fast. The sector was recently given a valuation of more than $150 billion and continues to expand year-on-year.

And while the longer-term impact of COVID-19 on the sector is yet to be determined, there’s no doubt that the demand for certain fintech solutions is on the rise. As smaller financial institutions across the region are under pressure to digitize, many are calling on fintechs to help them along this journey. In addition, a number of SMEs are seeking out digital loan services to help them get through the crisis.

The sector’s speedy expansion has meant that regulators in LatAm are under increasing pressure to enact legislation that addresses the murky waters of fintech activity, providing confidence to consumers and investors alike. However, regulation across the region must be careful to not quash innovation, while startups must figure out how to be agile in an environment which is becoming increasingly regulated. Let’s take a closer look at what impact regulation has had so far in LatAm, and what needs to happen to strike a balance between sector growth and public trust.

The development of fintech regulation across LatAm

Mexico is currently leading the way when it comes to fintech regulation in LatAm, thanks to its comprehensive 2018 fintech Law. The law covers most fintech activities, including crowdfunding, virtual wallet, transactions carried out with cryptocurrencies and open banking. In addition, Mexico has certain financial laws that regulate financial entities in their execution of transactions using fintech. The law also provides a regulatory sandbox for both licensed and non-licensed companies.

Brazil is the furthest ahead after Mexico, as it individually legislates crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending, while a special congressional commission is working on a broader legislative strategy. Brazil’s Central Bank also endeavors to make open banking legislation effective by the third quarter of 2020, which will pave the way for a thriving open banking ecosystem.

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The Station: Via hits $2.25B valuation, letters from readers, layoffs in a time of COVID-19

Hi, and welcome back to The Station, a weekly newsletter dedicated to all the ways people and packages travel from Point A to Point B. I’m your host Kirsten Korosec, senior transportation reporter at TechCrunch. If this is your first time, hello; I’m glad you’re with us.
I have started to publish a version of the newsletter on TechCrunch. That’s what you’re reading now. For the whole newsletter, which comes out every weekend, you can subscribe by heading over here, and clicking “The Station.” It’s free!
Last week, I asked readers to share how …

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