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China wants to make its Christians more Chinese

IN 1867 AN English missionary, James Hudson Taylor, wrote a letter home defending his policy of encouraging fellow preachers in China to wear Chinese robes and the Manchu-style pigtail. By dressing in Western garb, he argued, they risked giving the impression that becoming a Christian meant becoming a foreigner. Taylor’s concern was justified. Such was the scorn for those who embraced the faith that, long before the Communist Party seized power in 1949, people used to say, “One more Christian, one fewer Chinese.” Officials in China still mutter this phrase today.Listen to this storyYour browser does not support the element. …

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A joint WHO-China study of covid-19’s origins leaves much unclear

WEEKS AFTER a team of experts from China and the World Health Organisation (WHO) conducted a joint inquiry into the origins of covid-19, their report, released on March 30th, gave no clear verdict. It said the most probable explanation was that the virus had jumped from animals to humans through an intermediate animal host. But the scientific search for a definitive answer will remain challenging because of geopolitical tensions and China’s attempts at obfuscation.Listen to this storyYour browser does not support the element.Enjoy more audio and podcasts on iOS or Android.The report says it is “extremely …

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China is betting that the West is in irreversible decline

ITS GAZE fixed on the prize of becoming rich and strong, China has spent the past 40 years as a risk-averse bully. Quick to inflict pain on smaller powers, it has been more cautious around any country capable of punching back. Recently, however, China’s risk calculations have seemed to change. First Yang Jiechi, the Communist Party’s foreign-policy chief, lectured American diplomats at a bilateral meeting in Alaska, pointing out the failings of American democracy. That earned him hero status back home. Then China imposed sanctions on British, Canadian and European Union politicians, diplomats, academics, lawyers and democracy campaigners. Those …

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Japan Is Finding It Harder to Stay Quiet on China’s Abuse of Uyghurs

TOKYO — Last summer, Halmat Rozi, a Uyghur Muslim living in Japan, received a video call from his brother in China’s western Xinjiang region. His brother said he had someone he wanted Mr. Rozi to meet: a Chinese security officer.China’s top leader, Xi Jinping, had been invited to Japan, and the officer had some questions. Were Mr. Rozi and his fellow Uyghur activists planning protests? Who were the group’s leaders? What work were they doing? If Mr. Rozi cooperated, his family in China would be well cared for, the officer assured him on a second video call. …

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BBC’s John Sudworth Leaves China, Citing Growing Risks

At times, the propaganda campaign zeroed in on Mr. Sudworth, a longtime BBC correspondent who won a George Polk Award last year for his reporting on the internment camps in Xinjiang. The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China said on Wednesday that Chinese state media had posted videos of Mr. Sudworth online using footage obtained from police cameras.Last month, The Global Times, a state-backed nationalist tabloid, published a widely circulated article attacking Mr. Sudworth for his Xinjiang reporting and accusing him of being an “anti-China” journalist backed by “foreign forces,” including the United States.“In the past few years, the …

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Britain Holds On to a Colony in Africa, With America’s Help

The cause is a little-known group of 55 islands in the middle of the Indian Ocean known as the Chagos Archipelago. For 150 years they were part of the British colony of Mauritius. Then, in 1965, at the instigation of President Lyndon Johnson, Britain decided to separate the islands from Mauritius and, at just the time that the world was agreeing the era of colonialism was over, created a new colony, called the British Indian Ocean Territory. One of the islands, Diego Garcia, was leased to the United States for a military base.Mauritius got its independence in 1968, but without Chagos. The entire …

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China’s Tesla challengers report record first-quarter sales, but still face uphill battle to catch global EV leader

China’s main Tesla rivals, NIO and Xpeng, reported record sales in the first quarter of this year as smart electric vehicles increasingly hit the mark with mainland motorists.Although both saw deliveries surge more than fivefold from the same period of 2020, they are still a long way behind the American electric-car giant.Shanghai-based NIO said on Thursday that it delivered 20,060 vehicles from January to March, a huge leap of 423 per cent from the same period a year ago.Guangzhou…

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Value of TikTok maker ByteDance approaches US$400 billion for new investors, sources say

The valuation of ByteDance is approaching US$400 billion for private-equity investors, a source told the South China Morning Post, as the Chinese owner of short video-sharing app TikTok cements its leading position among global tech unicorns.The person, who was briefed on the matter, said the value of the Beijing-based start-up has been swelling in the private market as it considers a public listing for TikTok’s Chinese sibling app Douyin.The new valuation of nearly US$400 billion, if confirmed…

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Apple’s carbon-neutral goal gathers pace as it brings 2GW of renewable energy online in China

Apple has made deep inroads in helping its suppliers in China transition to renewable energy and achieve its carbon-neutral target by 2030 by exceeding its goal of bringing online over 2 gigawatts of renewable energy on the mainland. By surpassing its green energy goal, the Cupertino, California-based company said it can avoid the emission of nearly 4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide annually in China – the equivalent of taking nearly 1 million cars off the road each year.Last July, Apple…

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