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How nanoparticles could change the way we treat cancer | Joy Wolfram

Ninety-nine percent of cancer drugs never make it to tumors, getting washed out of the body before they have time to do their job. How can we better deliver life-saving drugs? Cancer researcher Joy Wolfram shares cutting-edge medical research into nanoparticles — tiny particles that could be used to deliver drugs accurately to tumors — and explains how they could keep drugs in the body longer to attack malignant cells.

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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A love story for the coral reef crisis | Ayana Elizabeth Johnson

Over the course of dozens of scuba diving trips, marine biologist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson fell in love — with a fish. In this ode to parrotfish, she shares five reasons why these creatures are simply amazing (from their ability to poop white sand to make colorful “wardrobe changes”) and shows why they need our protection from the destruction of coral reefs.

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How a handful of fishing villages sparked a marine conservation revolution | Alasdair Harris

We need a radically new approach to ocean conservation, says marine biologist Alasdair Harris. In a visionary talk, he lays out a surprising solution to the problem of overfishing that could both revive marine life and rebuild local fisheries — all by taking less from the ocean. “When we design it right, marine conservation reaps dividends that go far beyond protecting nature,” he says.

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Continue reading How a handful of fishing villages sparked a marine conservation revolution | Alasdair Harris

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A circular economy for salt that keeps rivers clean | Tina Arrowood

During the winter of 2018-2019, one million tons of salt were applied to icy roads in the state of Pennsylvania alone. The salt from industrial uses like this often ends up in freshwater rivers, making their water undrinkable and contributing to a growing global crisis. How can we better protect these precious natural resources? Physical organic chemist Tina Arrowood shares a three-step plan to keep salt out of rivers — and create a circular salt economy that turns industrial byproducts into valuable resources.

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How family separation at the US-Mexico border affects children’s mental health | Luis H. Zayas

How does psychological trauma affect children’s developing brains? In this powerful talk, social worker Luis H. Zayas discusses his work with refugees and asylum-seeking families at the US-Mexico border. What emerges is a stunning analysis of the long-term impact of the US’s controversial detention and child separation policies — and practical steps for how the country can do better.

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Continue reading How family separation at the US-Mexico border affects children’s mental health | Luis H. Zayas

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An app that helps incarcerated people stay connected to their families | Marcus Bullock

Over his eight-year prison sentence, Marcus Bullock was sustained by his mother’s love — and by the daily letters and photos she sent of life on the outside. Years later, as an entrepreneur, Bullock asked himself: How can I make it easier for all families to stay connected during incarceration? Enter FlikShop: an app he developed that lets families send quick postcards to loved ones in prison and help keep open a critical line of support.

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How we can eliminate child sexual abuse material from the internet | Julie Cordua

Social entrepreneur Julie Cordua works on a problem that isn’t easy to talk about: the sexual abuse of children in images and videos on the internet. At Thorn, she’s building technology to connect the dots between the tech industry, law enforcement and government — so we can swiftly end the viral distribution of abuse material and rescue children faster. Learn more about how this scalable solution could help dismantle the communities normalizing child sexual abuse around the world today. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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The cosmic war between monotony and creativity | David Deutsch

Theoretical physicist David Deutsch delivers a mind-bending meditation on the “great monotony” — the idea that nothing novel has appeared in the universe for billions of years — and shows how humanity’s capacity to create explanatory knowledge could be the thing that bucks this trend. “Humans are not playthings of cosmic forces,” he says. “We are users of cosmic forces.”

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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Revelations from a lifetime of dance | Judith Jamison and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

“Dance can elevate our human experience beyond words,” says Judith Jamison, artistic director emerita of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. In between performances of excerpts from Alvin Ailey’s classic works “Revelations” and “Cry,” Jamison reflects on the enduring power of dance to transform history into art that thrills audiences around the world. (Performances by Solomon Dumas, Samantha Figgins and Constance Stamatiou)

Source: TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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New York City comptroller pushes 56 companies to improve diversity and adopt the NFL’s ‘Rooney Rule’

The move is in line with the “Rooney Rule,” an NFL policy adopted in 2003 that requires every team to interview at least one person of color for head coaching vacancies; it now includes other high-ranking front-office positions. The rule is named after Dan Rooney, the late former Pittsburgh Steelers owner who also chaired the league’s diversity committee.

“As a pension system, we want to invest in 21st century companies that represent the future — not companies with management teams that look like they’re out of the 1950s,” Stringer said in a statement. “It’s time for the business world to embrace these reforms that will lead to decades of progress.”

Stringer’s office said the companies have yet to adopt Rooney-type search policies for boards or CEO positions, based on his review.

Other companies — such as Facebook, Amazon and Costco Warehouse — have adopted such policies at the board level, at times in response to investor pressure.

Stringer’s office said about two dozen of the 56 companies appear to have no minorities on their board.

The new campaign is the third phase of an effort to improve the accountability and diversity of corporate boards, a statement from Stringer’s office said. In 2014, his office launched a campaign to give investors more power to nominate directors, a process known as “proxy access.” More than 600 companies have since adopted proxy access.

Stringer has also pushed to get boards to disclose in a matrix format more details about directors’ experience and demographic background.

The office is likely to issue shareholder proposals for next year’s proxy season for companies that do not adopt the policy, according to Stringer’s office. Investors vote on such proposals during annual meeting season and companies can decide whether to implement them — but the vote often generates additional, and sometimes unwanted, attention for the company.

It’s quite possible many companies will argue they already interview minority or female candidates for these jobs and that an official policy is not needed. How investors would hold companies accountable for sticking to the rule is also questionable. Given the incredibly private nature of board and CEO searches, it’s unclear what consequences companies would face if they adopted such a policy but didn’t follow through, or how shareholders would even know if they didn’t.

“This is about changing market practice and ensuring that diversity is front-and-center in leadership searches around the country,” Stringer said in an emailed statement. “If we don’t see real change in companies with persistent lack of diversity, then we’ll vote against the board nominating committees.”

Among Russell 3000 companies — an index that represents most publicly traded companies on major U.S. stock exchanges — just 20 percent of board seats are held by women, according to the research firm Equilar. The percentage is higher among the largest U.S. firms, with 27 percent of S&P 500 company board seats held by women as of July. A study by Deloitte and the Alliance for Board Diversity said total minority representation among Fortune 500 board seats was 16.1 percent in 2018.

Meanwhile, women make up just 5 percent of the chief executive jobs among the S&P 500. Only four current Fortune 500 CEOs — fewer than 1 percent — are black, and none of those four are women, according to a report released Thursday by the executive search firm Korn Ferry.

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Source: Leadership
Continue reading New York City comptroller pushes 56 companies to improve diversity and adopt the NFL’s ‘Rooney Rule’